maths

A joined-up cosmos for geniuses?

Recently I wrote about my impression of a predominance of religious worldviews and practices among the most celebrated mathematicians.  I concluded by indicating that I wouldn't be surprised if religious worldviews were more conducive to great advances in maths and other disciplines, because of the way that faith and imagination are involved in discovery.  Today I'd like to explore some slightly more specific ideas about how that might work.  This is very tentative, largely because I'm clearly not one of those mathematical geniuses myself!  But I wan

On the sources of genius

Portraits of Euler, Gauss, Cantor, Ramanujan, Noether, Hilbert, Godel

[Portraits of (L-R) Euler, Gauss, Cantor, Ramanujan, Noether, Hilbert and Gö​del from the public domain]

In teaching elementary probability and statistics to undergraduates, I've been reading about some of the great mathematicians who are commemorated in the names of functions and constants. This has led me to ponder the role of religious worldviews in mathematical genius, and it's on that topic that I'd like to share a few thoughts today.  I hope that some readers here may have further knowledge and ideas to share.